Matthew Hunter’s Research

My work explores interfaces between physical materials and cognitive processes — between making and knowing. I have recently completed a book entitled *Wicked Intelligence: Visual Art and the Science of Experiment in Restoration London* (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming). Organized around the nested actions of drawing, collecting and architectural building ca. 1650-ca.1720, the book examines the sprawling domains of visualization produced by experimental-philosophical collaborators and the ruthless cleverness required to manage them. I have recently begun work on a new project on Joshua Reynolds’s chemistry. More broadly, my research interests include theories of representation in art and science, structures of artistic community, history and theory of collecting, and art-historical methodology. Having trained in studio art, I am also very interested in what historical interpretation can learn from contemporary art.

Recent publications:

Wicked Intelligence: Visual Art and the Science of Experiment in Restoration London (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming)

Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science, eds. R. Frigg and M. Hunter (New York: Springer Verlag, 2010)
“Picture/Object/Puzzle/Prompter: Devilish Cleverness in Restoration London,” Art History: Special Issue “The Clever Object” (forthcoming, April 2013)
“Experiment, Theory, Representation: Robert Hooke’s Material Models,” in Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science, eds. R. Frigg and M. Hunter (New York: Springer Verlag, 2010), 193-219
“The Theory of the Impression According to Robert Hooke,” in Printed Images in Early Modern Britain: Essays in Interpretation, ed. Michael Hunter (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010), 167-190

“Hooke’s Figurations: A Figural Drawing Attributed to Robert Hooke,” Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London 64 (March 2010): 251-260

Advertisements
Gallery | This entry was posted in Current research. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Matthew Hunter’s Research

  1. Pingback: The curiously drawn line on which Art meets Science | Origins of Science as a Visual Pursuit

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s